Gillo Gold Medal G1

Vittorio and Michelle Frangilli have developed a new riser, the Gillo Gold Medal G1.

I have been following their progress on Facebook and Archery talk where they’ve been dropping hints of what’s to come. This past week they posted pictures and information about the riser. Vittorio Frangilli wrote the following:

Michelle Frangilli G1

Michelle Frangilli will debut the G1 in competition in Antalaya, Turkey for the 3rd stage of the World Cup.

“This riser is the sum of our 20 years experience in riser design, made by archers for archers and targeted to people that know what they want from a riser: performance and reliability, with minimum frills and minimum price”.

The riser is designed so it can be used as either a barebow platform or for recurve archery. Michelle Frangilli will be debuting their riser on June 10 in Antalaya, Turkey where the 3rd stage of the World Cup is being held.

The Frangilli’s have a long history of design and testing with risers such as  the Bernadini Ghibly, Best Zenit, Spigarelli VBS 2001, and the Luxor 27″. Their objectives as put by them, are:

  • ” Make a riser based on Best Zenit super tested winning geometries, but more versatile in balancing for both recurve and Bare Bow.”
  •  “Make a riser cheaper than Best Zenit, more close in price to the Best Moon in the basic version. Target retail price in Europe for the 25″ is 399.00 Euro only”

By the way that is aprox $ 550 US. Details on the G1 below:

Gillo G1 riser info

G1 optional accessories:

Gillo G1 riser info 2

Bare bow Cover – external weights:

Barebow options Gillo G1

Internal handle disk weights:

Gillo G1 weight system

With six stabilizer holes, integral weights in the body and a combination of external barebow weights available, this riser will provide an archer many options for apportioning weight, and balance to their bows.

This is what Vittorio had to say on the subject:

“This riser is born to make all archers happy about the number of possibilities they will get to make its balance different. Combining all standard options available, you will be able to reach more than 150 balance combinations without adding any stabilizer or weight to the 6 (six) x 5/16-24 stabilizers holes. But then you wil have even more possibilities adding additional weights to the 3 front holes of the special Bare bow covers, if you use it. A real toy that will fill your time for a long future… just trying to find the right combination for you.”

The riser has plenty of nice details, like a partially recessed sight window to keep clicker fasteners out of view, and I really like the windows that allow you to see limb information and limb bolt inner works, see pics:

 

Gillo G1

Gillo G1 BB

If you are a barebow archer this riser is like hitting the jackpot, the Frangilli’s have really made great efforts in providing BB accessories. The barebow external weights in aluminum (270gr) and in steel (790 gr) can also be mounted upside down for a totally different feel. Somebody on the net calculated 320 different ways to add weight and personalize the feel of this riser by also using the holes on the barebow external weights.

So, where do you get one?  The ones I know about are (undoubtedly more to come):

Congratulations to the Frangilli’s on what appears to be a real winner.

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“Nock on” – The Podcast

I have a longish commute and so I’m always on the search for audio books, podcasts and the such. I recently caught John Dudley’s new “Nock on” Podcast.

I have listened to the first two podcasts thus far and found that the “Dud”  is passing on some great archery information. I really liked what he had to say about stabilizers and I could relate to what his guest, Christian Berg (editor of Peterson’s Bowhunting), is going through with a strained shoulder, and what is helping him. I think John Dudley is on a good path sharing his knowledge, kudos to him, I say.

You can find a link to his ITunes Podcast below:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/nock-on/id827919428?mt=2

Spigarelli Explorer II – a review

Last spring I purchased a Spigarelli Explorer II. Previously I had been shooting a Spigarelli Barebow which, by the way, is an excellent riser for those who delve into the mysteries of barebow archery, barebow risers tend to be heavy though and I wanted a
lighter riser where I could customize the balance of the bow by apportioning weight where I wanted on the riser body and still not end up with too heavy a bow.

Spig Explorer in snow

The Spigarelli Explorer II has been a good solution for me. It is thoughtfully designed and a versatile platform for shooting either FITA or barebow archery.

The 25 inch Spig Explorer II riser weighs in at 2 pounds 10 oz (1.194 kg) with the grip mounted. Making it a comfortable mid weight riser.

What makes this riser so flexible are the many options for distributing weight. There are 3 stabilizer bushings on the back of the riser (the side that faces the target), and two additional bushings to add counterweight on the belly of the riser.

Bottom and middle stabilizer bushings

Bottom and middle stabilizer bushings

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Top bushing

Spig mid counterweight

Mid counterweight

Lower belly bushing

Bottom counterweight

Lastly there are two slots for internal handle weights. These teardrop slots take 7.4 oz (210 grams) Spigarelli weights which can be inserted into either the top, bottom or both slots. Should you choose to add both weights you’re adding nearly a pound of additional weight to the bottom half of the riser body.

P1010375

Weight in top teardrop slot of handle

P1010372

Fastener holds the weight firmly, no vibrations/noise

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Weight in bottom teardrop slot.

One of the things that attracts me to this riser is the design, it is well thought out, functional and attractive. Take the teardrop slots for example, they reduce the weight of the overall riser, play a part in the appearance of the riser and double as receptacles for the internal weights.

Other interesting design niceties are the recessed sight window, which gives you a clean view eliminating or minimizing screw heads that protrude into the sight picture. Smart clicker design, which has a formed drop/indentation at the tip, allowing for a visual cue by the inward movement of the clicker as you draw the last couple millimeters of the arrow. There are also clicker reference marks machined into the riser. Spigarelli has gone a long way to account for the details enhancing an archer’s experience.

Recessed sight window

Recessed sight window also see clicker fold  which gives visual cue, when arrow is a couple of mm’s from end and machined clicker reference lines.

Included with the riser comes a clicker, an adjustable clicker plate, a stick on magnetic rest, tools and a handsome riser pouch (The arrow rest that is shown is not the provided rest it is a Spigarelli ZT rest, which I like because of it’s adjustability).

Clicker plate

Clicker plate

Adjustable clicker plate

Clicker plate can be adjusted out or in with a machine screw.

Limbs can be aligned by removing the two locking set screws on the outside of the riser and then adjusting the limb by tightening/loosening the inner set screws on either side of the riser.

LImb aligment screws

Adjusting the weight and tiller of the bow is also possible by tightening/loosening the limb bolts. The limb bolts can then be locked down by a machine screw on the belly of the riser.

Limb bolt

Limb bolt

Locking machine screws for limb bolts

Locking machine screws for limb bolts

The wooden grip that is provided with this riser, didn’t do it for me, so I purchased an aftermarket Jager grip. When I decided I wanted to try a higher wrist grip, I modified the wooden grip that came included. If you plan to purchase a Spigarelli riser be aware that you may want to modify the grip or purchase an aftermarket grip.

Modified Spig grip

Modified Spigarelli grip

The polished anodized finish on the riser is good. I did however find a couple of places (not obvious) where if I looked closely I saw  machining marks. See pic below:

Machine mark on Spig

This is not a big deal to me, as the rest of the riser outweighs the couple marks on it but it may be for you, as I mentioned they are not obvious.

The Spigarelli Explorer II is a nicely designed mid-weight riser, it has many options for stabilizers and weight that will work well with a FITA setup or barebow, it also has many design details which may enhance your archery experience, it is nicely finished, and comes with some extras like a clicker, clicker plate and magnetic rest. The grip isn’t great but there are options for after market grips and or you can modify the existing grip. I did find some machining marks on my riser, I don’t know if this is true of all Explorer II’s, the marks I found were not obvious and do not detract from the overall look and feel of this gear.  As of this writing a Spigarelli Explorer II can be had for $375.00 to $400.00 dollars.

For those that are looking for a solid mid-level riser, the Explorer II is a good choice and worthy of consideration. If barebow is your thing but you want a riser that can also be used for a FITA setup, the flexibility of this riser fits the bill perfectly.

2013 in review

Wishing all a great 2014!  – Charles Lopez

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 59,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 22 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

AAE Elite Adjustable Finger Spacer

Some months ago I purchased AAE’s Elite Adjustable Finger Spacer for my AAE Cavalier tab.

AAE Elite spacer

This was prompted because after prolonged shooting I would have some soreness behind the first digit of my index finger where my finger was in contact with the hard outside edge of the standard spacer. Maybe a form issue however it made me check into spacer options.

The Adjustable Finger Spacer kit comes with an aluminum spacer, a soft rubber band that fits over the spacer, a fastener and a flexible, 3 x 3 inch, flat, plastic square.

Soft rubber band for Adjustable Spacer

P1000854

What the heck is this for? No instructions…

When I opened the package I was surprised that only a single screw was supplied as the standard spacer uses two. I wondered if this would make for a secure fit or if the spacer would roam on the tab surface.

I also had no idea what the flat plastic square was for. There were no instructions in my package that clarified this.

Off came the old spacer and I attached the new, as the name indicates the finger spacer is adjustable. It has 3 holes which allow you to move it forward or aft to fit your hand and get it snug or loose against the web between your index and middle finger, depending on your preference and comfort.

AAE Elite Adjustable Spacer

I tightened the spacer down and although it was a single screw it seated well into the leather and didn’t wander as I’d feared.

I then grabbed the soft rubber band and tried to get it over the spacer, it was seemingly impossible to stretch over the spacer, suddenly the use of the plastic square became clear. It had to be a grabber that gave you a better grip and allowed you to stretch the band over the spacer. I tried it and it worked!

The adjustable spacer fills the gap between your fingers and doesn’t leave hard edges for your fingers to rest upon, where they might become sore. The fit against the web between your index and middle finger is snug and solid. It makes hand and tab feel like one. In my estimation this is the spacer’s best feature.

P1000866

AAE Elite Adjustable Finger Spacer fills the spacer between your fingers and against the web of your fingers fore and aft, making tab and hand integrate better and feel more like a single unit.

Standard spacer.

Standard spacer.

It is also more comfortable than the standard spacer. It has a smooth anodized finish with nice, rounded edges,you can add the band for a soft rubber feel and extra girth between your fingers.

Spacer without the rubber band

Spacer without the rubber band, note smooth finish and rounded edges.

As far as cost, Lancaster Archery currently has the spacer listed for $17.99.

Archers shoot the Cavalier tab in all sorts of configurations. With spacer, without spacer, with shelf and without the shelf, with many or a few layers of leather, superleather, calfhair and or rubber. Some are filed down for a personal fit. Folks adapt these excellent tabs in all sorts of ways to make them feel right to their draw, anchor and release.

Our drawing hand is one of two places where we come in contact with the bow, making it our own, making it comfortable, making it accurate, seems worth the effort of experimentation. AAE’s Adjustable Finger Spacer is a good option towards that endeavor.

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Archery storage for small spaces

I have a 3 bedroom house, two sons and a mess of archery tackle.

Up to now my sons have shared a bedroom, leaving a bedroom to be used as combo archeryhaven, office and guestroom.

With the lads springing into teenagehood, they wanted to get out of their shared room and into their own. I’d want the same so I’m cool with that. It just meant that the archery empire would have to move.

I don’t have a basement or garage and so I looked around at the options. My dad’s archery cabinet and his bows could go out into the family room area and just be a part of the rest of the house. I thought of my bedroom but my wife gave me the evil eye when I mentioned it so I quickly dropped that plan, which didn’t leave me too many options. Really the only space left was our shed outside or a closet.

The shed just had a skunk move in, which may end up involving archery gear, but trudging out there really wasn’t practical, which made the decision easy (by the way if you know how to get rid of a skunk without them invoking “the potion”, let me know).

The closet is already home to tools, glue, nails and general hardware, fixit stuff but it was jammed packed, so I spent a couple of weekends judiciously utilizing the adage, “When in doubt, throw it out”, (or recycle) until I could see some promise in there.

P1000788

Tool, hardware and now also archery closet.

I already had a lot of archery hardware in organizer cases and I figured I could store bows vertically on a pegboard. Arrows in tubes, my compound bow hung, my fletching stuff in a box and it all came together. Frankly, I’ve been very pleased with everything having a home. I’m sure there will be changes but I think I’m off to a good start.

Bows hung vertically

P1000816

Archery storage shelf

Organizer box

Hanging hook

Hook is made from clothes hanger wire, some tape and some small hose to protect the bow.

For a workspace, a place to fletch arrows, tune, and do archery stuff I moved a small desk into a corner of the house.

In the end I’ve been downsized but that’s small potatoes and a very small sacrifice in comparison to seeing the excitement in my sons eyes at setting up their bedrooms and having them be their own.

Counting arrows

Here’s a little tool that you can use to help you achieve training goals. It is inexpensive, small, easy to carry around and simple to use. What is it you ask?

It is the venerable sports counter.

Arrow counter

Many archers have daily and or weekly arrow goals. Whether that is 300 a week or 300 a day, a sports counter is an easy way to keep track of arrows shot, that and a log and you have a nice system to gauge the pace of your training.

I got curious about one when I heard another archer mention the benefits, so up to Amazon I went and found a slew of them for little money. A couple of dollars for a simple and seemingly foolproof training aid is rare in the archery world, so I jumped in feet first and am glad I did.

When I first tried it I would click the counter after every arrow, but I quickly realized that wasn’t going to work for me, it was too much of a disruption to my sequence because I’d forget then think about it midway through my next shot.

I now click them in after each end when I go to retrieve them. Archery is a chain of small events and I needed it to find a place for it in the procession.

Sports counter on quiver

I hang it off my quiver with a small carabiner where it is at easy reach. I would emphasize easy, because if it’s not easy you’re just not going to do it, so don’t bury it.

I paid $1.51 for the one I bought. Here’s the GINORMOUS Amazon link:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00AG2846O/ref=pe_309540_26725410_item

By the way, this would make a thoughtful gift for another archer, think mother’s day for your archery mom.

Best, C