Removing glued in points from carbon arrows

I recently had to swap out glued in points from a set of carbon arrows. I was going from lighter points to heavier points to weaken the arrow spine. The arrows points were set in with hot melt glue, so I knew I would have to apply a heat source to the points in order to soften the glue enough to remove them. I checked the internet for options.

I found many suggestions on the web, torch, lighters, and others, but the two methods that caught my eye were offered by Dennis Lieu, archery coach at UC Berkeley, in this article. He suggests using hot water and or a hair dryer as the heat source. This appealed to me as these heat sources seemed more benign than a fire source and I didn’t want to over do it on my first time and risk ruining perfectly good arrows.

I don’t have a hair dryer so the water method came first while I put the word out to borrow a hair dryer. Dennis Lieu’s water method is to place a cup of water in the microwave, bring it to a boil, then dip the arrows in and pull the points, re-heating the water as necessary as it cooled down.

Water boils at 212 degrees and I wondered if I could do it with less temperature. I boiled water in a kettle, and in a sturdy glass put in 1/4 of room temperature water to 3/4 boiling water, then placed my wife’s candy thermometer to see what I had.

thermometer

About 154, 155 degrees

The thermometer was reading in the mid 150’s, I placed two arrows in the water, gave them what I felt was enough time (20 – 30 seconds) and tried pulling the points with a pair of linesman pliers.

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Linesman pliers w

I used an old pair of linesman pliers with adhesive cloth tape wrapped around jaws, so as to not mar arrow points.

The points pulled out fine, I flexed the arrows afterwards and visually inspected them, all seemed well.

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Meanwhile, a hair dryer had come through via a friend in town. The hair dryer was 1875 watts, which translates to plenty of heat. After getting the water temperature I was curious what temperature the hair dryer generated. I used the same thermometer and had it consistently top out at 165 to 170 degrees.

I set up out on deck for good light, and heated both the point and the first few inches of the arrow. I rotated the arrow while doing it and kept the dryer in motion to keep the heat even. I had the dryer about an inch from the shaft moving it quickly around the shaft.

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I had no issues pulling the points, as with the water method I flexed and inspected the shafts afterwards and could not detect any problems. Since then I’ve also shot these arrows and I can’t find any damage to the arrows using these methods.

The hot melt glue used in these shafts is Flitemate hot melt glue which is a low temp glue designed for carbon arrows, you may (or may not) need higher temps if you are using a regular temperature hot melt glue.

Dennis Lieu’s methods worked really well for me, it allowed me a lot of control and a mild approach to removing glued in points. In the same article he also describes his method for gluing points in with hot melt, worth a read. Find it here.

 

Carbon Express Medallion XR’s

Carbon Express medallion xr

Because of a recent shoulder injury I purchased a set of ultra-light 14 pound “rehab” limbs, which at my draw translates to 16 pounds on the fingers. I tend to be fussy about my arrows being well tuned to the bow, so I went in search of arrows that would work with such a light setup.

There were some challenges, one finding a high enough spine and two finding a long enough arrow, for my 29 1/4 draw. The only arrow I was able to find that would fit both these parameters was the versatile Medallion XR made by Carbon Express. Not only did they have a 2.000″ spine arrow, they had it in a 29 inch length which fit the bill perfectly.

Medallion xr shaft

The Medallion XR is an ideal target arrow for light weight draw bow setups or youth looking for a quality carbon arrow in a spine that fits them.

I’ve posted the arrow specs below:

  • Spine selection tolerance: ± 0.0025″ max.
  • Weight tolerance: ± 1.0 grains
  • Straightness: ± 0.003″
SPECIFICATIONS:

    * Bare shaft weight
Model Size Qty Grains/Inch* Spine Diameter
SHAFT
50413 2000 12 pack 5.1 2.000″ 0.176″
50414 1800 12 pack 5.3 1.800″ 0.177″
51560 1500 12 pack 5.9 1.500″ 0.183″
51561 1300 12 pack 6.4 1.300″ 0.188″
50403 1100 12 pack 4.6 1.100″ 0.224″
50404 1000 12 pack 4.9 1.000″ 0.226″
50405 900 12 pack 5.2 0.900″ 0.228″
50406 800 12 pack 5.6 0.800″ 0.230″
50407 700 12 pack 6.0 0.700″ 0.233″
50408 600 12 pack 6.7 0.600″ 0.239″
50415 500 12 pack 7.6 0.500″ 0.244″

Carbon Express has also updated their arrow charts and added a Light Recurve Target Arrow Chart which is a good starting point in figuring out the right shaft for your setup.

Pin nocks

A few things to keep in mind about these arrows are the accessories. These arrows take glue in points, pin nock adapters and pin nocks. The pin nocks adapters come with the shafts. Depending on the size shafts you purchase there are different points. All of them allow you to adjust the weight of the tip. See Carbon Express’ Component chart below:

Name Model# Arrow Size Weight Qty
ADAPTERS
Medallion™-XR Pin Nock Adapter 50410 500, 600, 700, 800, 900, 1000, 1100 8 12 pack
Nano-Pro™ Pin Nock Adapter #2 50123 1300, 1500, 1800, 2000 6.9 12 pack
NOCKS
Soma Nock #1 (14-18 Strand Strings) Small Green 50136 Fits all standard pin nock adapters 3.4 12 pack
Soma Nock #2 (20-24 Strand Strings) Large Green 50137 Fits all standard pin nock adapters 3.4 12 pack
Soma Nock #1 (14-18 Strand Strings) Small Yellow 50138 Fits all standard pin nock adapters 3.4 12 pack
Soma Nock #2 (20-24 Strand Strings) Large Yellow 50139 Fits all standard pin nock adapters 3.4 12 pack
Soma Nock #2 (20-24 Stand Strings) Large Lime Green 50231 Fits all standard pin nock adapters 3.4 12 pack
Soma Nock #2 (20-24 Strand Strings) Large Pink 50232 Fits all standard pin nock adapters 3.4 12 pack
POINTS
Medallion™ XR Target Point 50411 500, 600, 700, 800, 900, 1000, 1100 110-60 adjustable 12 pack
Medallion™-XR Stainless Steel Target Point 50412 1300, 1500, 1800, 2000 60-40 adjustable 12 pack

On the money end I paid about $12.25 for a complete arrow to include vanes. 

In summary, I would say that these are sweet, well made, shafts, they come in a great range of spine offerings and  in long enough lengths to accommodate not only youth archers but also older blokes like me who for one reason or another are shooting lightweight bows.

C.

 

Screw on field tips keep coming loose?

Field tips

For a long time, my routine, after shooting at a target butt would be to pull my arrows, then check and tighten the tips so I’d be ready for the next end, it had become an intrinsic part of my process… and it was a pain.

Even though I’d check I would get loose tips. I could hear them rattling all the way to the target. Looking for a solution I thought I’d apply a little blue Loctite to the threads but a fellow archer offered a simpler solution and most of you already have what you need to solve this little problem forever.

His advice was to use string wax, the stuff that’s in your quiver pocket.

String Wax

Apply the string wax to the threads of your field tip.

waxing threads on field tips

Screw the tip back on to the arrow insert.

Waxed field tip series

You’re ready to go.

Field tip

One caveat:

I live in Maine where we don’t have 100 degree days so I have not tested this method in extraordinary heat. If you use this method and you’ve tried it on some scorcher days, please leave me a comment with your results.

Thanks, C.

Archery storage for small spaces

I have a 3 bedroom house, two sons and a mess of archery tackle.

Up to now my sons have shared a bedroom, leaving a bedroom to be used as combo archeryhaven, office and guestroom.

With the lads springing into teenagehood, they wanted to get out of their shared room and into their own. I’d want the same so I’m cool with that. It just meant that the archery empire would have to move.

I don’t have a basement or garage and so I looked around at the options. My dad’s archery cabinet and his bows could go out into the family room area and just be a part of the rest of the house. I thought of my bedroom but my wife gave me the evil eye when I mentioned it so I quickly dropped that plan, which didn’t leave me too many options. Really the only space left was our shed outside or a closet.

The shed just had a skunk move in, which may end up involving archery gear, but trudging out there really wasn’t practical, which made the decision easy (by the way if you know how to get rid of a skunk without them invoking “the potion”, let me know).

The closet is already home to tools, glue, nails and general hardware, fixit stuff but it was jammed packed, so I spent a couple of weekends judiciously utilizing the adage, “When in doubt, throw it out”, (or recycle) until I could see some promise in there.

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Tool, hardware and now also archery closet.

I already had a lot of archery hardware in organizer cases and I figured I could store bows vertically on a pegboard. Arrows in tubes, my compound bow hung, my fletching stuff in a box and it all came together. Frankly, I’ve been very pleased with everything having a home. I’m sure there will be changes but I think I’m off to a good start.

Bows hung vertically

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Archery storage shelf

Organizer box

Hanging hook

Hook is made from clothes hanger wire, some tape and some small hose to protect the bow.

For a workspace, a place to fletch arrows, tune, and do archery stuff I moved a small desk into a corner of the house.

In the end I’ve been downsized but that’s small potatoes and a very small sacrifice in comparison to seeing the excitement in my sons eyes at setting up their bedrooms and having them be their own.

How to fletch arrows

Fletching arrows like many things is a matter of following steps and paying attention.

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Not every step is crucial but if you want your feathers/vanes to hang on when you accidentally shoot through a bale or clicker and or when you’re shooting tight groups it pays to have paid attention to the details.

Big hint number one for success is to work clean. Start by washing your hands to keep your natural skin oils away from the surfaces you’ll be applying glue to, keep your work area clean, and if you just ate mama’s fried chicken, scrub up well!

Next on the cleaning list are your shafts, when I first started fletching my own arrows my local shop sold me  a shaft cleaner made by AAE, but any powder cleaner like Ajax or Comet will do the job.

Put it on and scrub it in with a clean abrasive pad. See pic below.

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Once you’ve cleaned your shafts well, rinse them with warm water, I like to use hot water so they air dry faster.

shafts being rinsed

This next step is crucial, whether you’re fletching carbon or aluminum arrows is to abrade/scuff the surface you’re going to glue to, so the glue has something to hold on to, specially with aluminum arrows which are slick indeed.

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I use 3M’s 7447 Scotch Brite Pad, some folks use steel wool or very, very fine (600 grit) sandpaper.

When I abrade the surface I do it in a left to right motion or at right angles to the shaft. Depending on the arrow, this usually means that I’m going across the grain, increasing my chances for good adhesion.

If you’re fletching carbon shafts there will be some carbon dust residue on your shafts, I usually wipe them with a clean rag.

Now that you’ve prepped your shafts you’re ready to glue your fletchings on. The majority of fletchings are glued on by using a fletching jig to guide the placement of your feathers or vanes onto the arrow and hold them there while the glue sets.

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Fletching clamp

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Fletching jig

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Here is the clamp holding the feather against the shaft while the glue sets, the clamp is held to the jig by a magnet.

Once I have the feather or vane in the clamp I apply a consistent bead of glue. I always have a rag nearby to deal with excess glue from the tube, which often continues to ooze wanting to make a mess.

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If I am gluing vanes I leave the vanes in the jig just a short time, 30 seconds to a minute. If I am gluing feathers and this depends on what you’re using for glue. I leave them in a lot longer. Feathers have some natural curvature to them, when you put them in a clamp you are changing that shape. The feather wants to spring back to it’s natural shape. If you pull the clamp early, before the glue has dried enough you risk the feather springing off the glue line.

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Once I’ve glued the vanes or feathers on, I will dab spots of glue on the leading and trailing edge of the fletching. This is cheap insurance and makes a difference in longevity.

Lastly I let them dry, preferably overnight. Depending on the glue you may be able to shoot them much quicker than that, I figure if I have the time it doesn’t hurt to let the glue fully cure.

There are clamps for  jigs that will angle your vanes or feathers differently on the arrow, how they are set on the arrow affects arrow flight. Find info on these clamps below.

Straight: There is no angle on the feather or vane, often commercially purchased arrows which come pre-fletched are straight fletched. With certain types of arrow rests it is preferred as the arrow can’t catch, think whisker biscuit arrow rests.

Offset: The fletching is angled on the shaft 1 or more degrees, this induces rotation  which has a gyroscopic effect on the arrow for a more stable flight.

Helical: Is angled on the shaft and also has corkscrew like bend (helix) to the fletching. Helical can provide the maximum amount of rotation, which means more stability in flight. It also means more drag than straight or offset making for a bit slower arrow than straight or offset.

Left or Right: Choose to have your feathers/vanes angle right or left, it doesn’t matter which.  When purchasing a fletching jig you will have to decide whether you want left or right clamps, also when buying feathers you have to indicate whether you want left or right feathers. Vanes are straight and can be used in either direction.

Personally I like an offset or helical, getting the arrow to spin and be a bit more forgiving.

Lastly, I’d like to mention the distance from the end of the arrow to the fletching, this

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changes depending on whether you are shooting with fingers or a release. The above arrow has 1 1/2 inches of clearance because it will be used with a finger release. When using a mechanical release you can have them further aft. The further back the better.

I have really enjoyed fletching my own, it gives me more control of the whole process, gets me involved in the craftsmanship of archery and opens a window into how things in archery work and why. You may want to give it a go yourself.

Clickers – My progress with the Olympic bow

I recently decided to try out Olympic style archery, having come from the barebow world.

I had been using a heavy barebow riser so I purchased an appropriate riser and the gear involved.

One of the items I purchased is a clicker. For those that don’t know, it is a metal strip that rides against the outside edge of your arrow as it is drawn, when the arrow is pulled beyond the clicker, the clicker springs to the riser, striking it and making a sound, which indicates to the archer that they’ve reached their pre-determined draw and can release the arrow.

Clicker - front view

Sounds simple but for it to work well means that your draw and form have to be consistent.

What I’ve found is that this little strip of metal is quite the taskmaster and if you’re paying attention it will point out your form errors.

Getting your errors pointed out to you is often two sided. When I’m struggling to pull through the clicker and I’m feeling frustrated it can very much be a pain in the patookie.

When I take the time to analyze why I’m struggling, allow it to sink through, figure out what the issues are and then see arrows striking gold, I feel uplifted and happy about the challenge.  What have the issues been, you ask?

The easy one to catch for me was not locking my bow shoulder down and letting it ride up which makes going through the clicker near impossible.

Clicker - side view

I also caught inconsistent finger grip on the string. This one has absolutely forced me to pay close attention at how I hook the string and what happens to this hook once under tension at full draw.

More insidious though are things like stance and I am now suspecting head position.

I realize now that all these little problems have existed all along but I was mostly unaware of them. I’ve had my suspicions but nothing like the clicker to make you stop and figure it out.

One of the things that I’ve come to appreciate about this little strip of metal is that aside from it’s intended function it is a good training aid, a bit of the yellow canary of archery, it gives a warning that something is not as it should.

I’m excited about learning the ways of Olympic archery and although frustrating at times the knowledge that I’m improving pushes me along. More to come..

Counting arrows

Here’s a little tool that you can use to help you achieve training goals. It is inexpensive, small, easy to carry around and simple to use. What is it you ask?

It is the venerable sports counter.

Arrow counter

Many archers have daily and or weekly arrow goals. Whether that is 300 a week or 300 a day, a sports counter is an easy way to keep track of arrows shot, that and a log and you have a nice system to gauge the pace of your training.

I got curious about one when I heard another archer mention the benefits, so up to Amazon I went and found a slew of them for little money. A couple of dollars for a simple and seemingly foolproof training aid is rare in the archery world, so I jumped in feet first and am glad I did.

When I first tried it I would click the counter after every arrow, but I quickly realized that wasn’t going to work for me, it was too much of a disruption to my sequence because I’d forget then think about it midway through my next shot.

I now click them in after each end when I go to retrieve them. Archery is a chain of small events and I needed it to find a place for it in the procession.

Sports counter on quiver

I hang it off my quiver with a small carabiner where it is at easy reach. I would emphasize easy, because if it’s not easy you’re just not going to do it, so don’t bury it.

I paid $1.51 for the one I bought. Here’s the GINORMOUS Amazon link:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00AG2846O/ref=pe_309540_26725410_item

By the way, this would make a thoughtful gift for another archer, think mother’s day for your archery mom.

Best, C

Starter Bows for kids

One of my co-workers asked me for a recommendation for a Christmas bow for her son, so while on this line of thought, I thought I’d share my research and thoughts on the subject.

I would start by saying that the very, very  best thing you can do, is to go to a good archery shop and let them help  you.

You want a place where archery is their main gig. There are some shops where archery is a sideline, not the mainstay of their business, you may end up with a bow that is not appropriate for a child. Do a little research on the web or ask someone knowledgeable in your area for a referral to a good shop.

Shops that are used to working with kids will often have a JOAD program (Junior Olympic Archery Development)  and lessons, these are great places for kids and their growth as archers and people. Very often these shops will have bows that you can try out.

If you don’t have access to a shop and or want to know what to look for in a bow for a child, just keep on reading, I’ll highlight the important stuff.

The number one issue for not only children but any new archer is bow weight. I don’t mean the physical weight of the bow but how much weight or “pull” an archer has to hold at full draw.

Bows are usually rated for a certain poundage at a certain length of draw, this rating is usually written on the bow or limbs.

This issue is important for a couple of reasons:

  • A young archers body is developing, a heavy bow can injure a child’s young body.
  • Too heavy a bow will be difficult to hold at full draw, which will make it hard to focus on the things they need to learn because they are too busy just trying to control the bow, it can also lead to bad form issues and general unhappiness. Too heavy a bow is often the reason a child loses interest in archery, its no fun!

Bows are not like other things where you can buy them a little big for your child to grow into them. You want to get the right size and weight for their current age and development. You can always pass them down to a sibling or resell them later, some bows have enough adjustment latitude that they will last a pretty long time.

Length of bow – This part is more common sensical, you want to get a bow that fits your child’s stature. This is easier as lighter weight bows meant for children are often already shorter/longer to accommodate a young shooter’s size.

Compound or a classical style bow?

Compound bows are technological marvels, they use modern, mechanical components to leverage energy in their favor. They are faster and more accurate than their classical counterparts. They are also more expensive and complicated and depending on your setup have more components and accessories to buy than classical bows. You will very likely need professional help to set one up  or tune it.

There are compound bows on the market now that have a wide range of weight adjustment making it possible to purchase a bow that will last a young person a long time, making your upfront investment last.

Classic bows are the eternal teachers of this discipline. Particularly the recurve bow, which is the mainstay of modern archery education.

The plus of these bows is that they are fundamentally simple. They are easy to maintain and are relatively inexpensive and you don’t need a lot of accessories to use one. You can learn to tune one yourself or have a professional help you.

Let’s get into it and go over some of the more popular bows for kids on the market today:

Samick Polaris

The bow on the left is a Samick Polaris takedown recurve. Takedown means that the bow can be broken down into three pieces, the riser (wooden middle section) and the two limbs. This can be practical for transporting the bow.

There are other makers of bows that have near identical bows to the one on the  left and would all be appropriate for a great starter bow, the ones that come to mind are  the PSE Buckeye and the Mohegan Recurve by Greatree Archery, in fact my youngest son, Alistair, owns a 16 lb Mohegan recurve.

All these bows seem to range somewhere in the $90.00 to $120.00 range.

If you decide to go the classic bow road, you will also need a bow stringer, they run aprox.  $10.00. Most of these bows come with an arrow rest, which sticks on to the bow for your arrow to sit on, should it not have an arrow rest, simple rests can be had for a few dollars. You will of course need arrows, again talking to a good pro shop is the way to go.

Now, there are of course many other options for a kid’s starter bow from simple fiberglass bows to traditional longbows, and Olympic recurves,  some cheaper and some more money. I’m just pointing out a true and tried style of bow used widely in early archery education, that will serve a young person well.

A popular kids compound bow is the Mathews Genesis.

Mathews Genesis

They are easily found,  and are a great first bow if you decide to go the compound road. They also come in nine different colors to include pink and camo, to suit most any kid.

Compound bows usually have a feature called let off, this means that as you draw the string you get to a point where the bow weight shifts and you’re only holding a fraction of the weight, usually 20% to  30% of the original weight. Making it easier to hold at full draw for longer.

This bow doesn’t have that and for the weight range, doesn’t need it. Not having let off makes it more easily acceptable to a variety of draw lengths and also helps the bow grow with the child.

The weight on this bow can be adjusted from 10 to 20 lbs.

This bow runs about $165.00, you can also buy a kit which will come with arrows, quiver, arm guard and targets for aprox. $ 220.00.

There is also a mini version of the Genesis, with adjustable weight from 6 to 12 pounds and a Pro version with adjustable weight from 15 to 25 lbs. The pro will run you $185.00 for the stock model.

Very similar to the Genesis Pro in concept is PSE’s Discovery 2. It also comes in a variety of colors and has the same universal draw length as the Genesis. The weight range of the PSE Discovery 2 is 20 to 29 pounds, so it has a bit more ummph, should you want it. My 11 year old owns this bow.  Price for one of these is about $180.00.

PSE Discovery 2

For parents of kids that want a compound bow that will have all the features of an adult sized compound, to include the ability to “let off” or shift gears to a lower holding weight, and a greater range of weight adjustment, a few bows come to mind.

PSE Miniburner w/accesories

PSE Miniburner w/accessories

PSE’s Miniburner is a full fledged compound bow. The weight is adjustable from 15 to 40 pounds which means that this bow can really grow with the child. They retail in the $200.00 range.

Diamond’s Infinite Edge is also a full compound bow and is adjustable from 5 to 70 lbs, a huge range of weight. You could shoot this bow as a young person and retire with it if you’d like.  It comes as a package deal with sights, rest, peep, quiver, etc. The package price will run you $ 349.00.

Diamond's infinite edge with accesories

Diamond’s infinite edge with accessories

I’ve shown you all these compound bows as viable options for a beginner however my personal belief is to start simple.

Which in my mind means starting with a straightforward stick and string, like the recurve pictured at the beginning of this post.

There are practical reasons for this like cost. A simple recurve will be cheaper than a compound, also compounds come with more accessories, sights, complex arrow rests, and releases to name a few. All of which will add to the expense. Another plus of starting with a simple less expensive bow is if your child finds that archery isn’t their cup of tea, you’re not in very deep.

Although a compound bow can be shot with fingers on the string, the majority of compound archers use a release. A release is a device that either straps to your wrist or you hold in your hand that attaches to the string. The release has a trigger, when you are ready to let go of the string you activate the trigger and off your arrow goes.

I say let them do it the way Robin Hood did it, with fingers on the string. Let them feel and be a part of archery’s long history. Once they’ve gotten a grasp of it and have built a bit of a foundation to their shooting and understand the fundamentals of archery via a simple bow,  they will then be in a great position to decide if they would like to give a compound or any other type of bow a try.

Whatever you decide, archery is a great discipline to introduce  to your children, the learning of which can transcend the simple act of releasing arrows and help them in their growth.

Indoor target scoring in archery

I sometimes post scores and different target system info assuming that everyone knows what I’m talking about, of course that is not the case.

Below find the definitions to two words you should know (end and round) and an explanation of NFAA indoor round scoring as well as the NFAA version of the Vegas Round. These are both indoor rounds which is what I’m buried to the hilt in now.

Keep in mind that there are many, many, many different types of rounds with different scoring, this only touches upon some of the more popular indoor rounds.

End – A set number of arrows that are shot before going to the target to score and retrieve your arrows. (usually 3 or 5 for indoor competition).

e.g.    We shot six ends before taking a break then shot six more, scoring after each end

e. g.    Let’s get there a bit early and shoot 4 or 5 ends to warm up before the round begins.

Round – The shooting of a definite number of arrows at specified target faces from set
distances.

e.g.    We shot a Vegas round this morning, next weekend we will shoot a NFAA indoor 300 round.

e.g.    An indoor NFAA 300 round consists of twelve 5 arrow ends at 20 yards, for a total of 60 arrows.

NFAA Indoor target

Ok, here it is, I’ve numbered the target with red numbers to clarify it. Anything in the white circle is awarded a 5 to include the inner X ring. X’s are used as tiebreakers, so if you shoot a score of 250 with 10 x’s and the guy next to you shoots 250 with 11 x’s they win.

An NFAA 300 round consists of 12 ends shot at 20 yards distance. That means you’re up at bat 12 times. Each end consists of 5 arrows, so you will step up to the line shoot 5 arrows, score them, retrieve them and then do it again, 12 times.

Here is the math part, each arrow has the potential of 5 points, so in each end you have the potential of scoring 25 points. 5 arrows shot x 5 points = 25 points.

There are 12 ends so if you shoot a perfect 25 in each end you will score 300 points.  12 x 25 = 300

Archers have 4 minutes to shoot 5 arrows. Capiche?

NFAA Indoor 5 spot

The first thing to know about this target is who it is meant for and why.

This target is for very accurate shooters but is mostly shot by very good compound bow shooters. Archers using this target are confident of not shooting anything lower than a 4, the reason the target is partitioned into 5 small targets or spots is so an archer can have the option to shoot one arrow per target. The reason they want to do that is so they don’t Robin Hood (shooting an arrow into the back of another)  arrows which gets expensive and annoying after a while, you also destroy the paper less since you’re shooting five different locations instead of a single paper location, making it easier to define scores.

For very good compound shooters this is really an X game. A perfect 300 score is a given so the person with the most X’s wins. There are compound shooters who score 300 points and 60 x’s which is perfection indeed.

The rest is scored the same as the single face target. 12 ends, 5 arrows per end. 5 possible points per arrow. 60 arrows. 300 points.

The indoor 5 spot can be shot in any order and the archer can shoot any number of arrows into any spot as the shooter wants not to exceed their 5 arrows of course.

As in the single face competitors have 4 minutes to shoot 5 arrows.

Now to Vegas… as in what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas, as least 3 times per end that is.

Vegas target – numbers are just for illustration.

In a Vegas round there are 10 ends. You shoot 3 arrows per end for a possible 10 points per arrow, or 30 possible points per end. 10 ends x 30 possible points = 300 possible points. The smallest inner X circle is 10 points as well as the next greater yellow circle. Your X count will go towards deciding tiebreakers. Competitors have 2 1/2 minutes to shoot 3 arrows.

There are variations of the Vegas round  like a 450 and 600 round instead of the above 300. A 450 round will have15 ends and a 600 round will have 20 ends, 3 arrows per end 10 possible points per arrow.

There are also variations with the X ring, which will be found with different archery organizations and locally, in this example I am addressing NFAA rules.

Lastly, there is the Vegas 3 spot.

Vegas 3 spot

The 3 spot like the NFAA blue face 5 spot is meant for more accurate shooters, who know they won’t shoot less than a 6. NFAA rules state that you can shoot the Vegas 3 spot target in any order but you must shoot just one arrow per spot.

One last important thing to know of all NFAA rounds and targets. If your arrow is touching the line of a higher scoring zone you are given the higher score. For example if you are shooting a blue face and your arrow is in the 4 ring but you are touching the 5 white ring, you are awarded the higher 5 point value.

This picture shows a typical shoot with a mixture of the NFAA indoor single face and the 5 spot depending on the competitor’s choice. This was taken at Central Maine Archery in Auburn, Maine.

The above covers the basics there are more rules and specifics about these rounds, If you’d like to know more click on the following link for the NFAA’s rulebook.

2012 – 2013 NFAA Constituiton and Bylaws

My first 25!

I shot my first 25 in practice today! Which means 5 arrows all in the white, each worth 5 points at 20 yards. This is with a recurve bow at 20 yards and no sights. Woo hoo!