Removing glued in points from carbon arrows

I recently had to swap out glued in points from a set of carbon arrows. I was going from lighter points to heavier points to weaken the arrow spine. The arrows points were set in with hot melt glue, so I knew I would have to apply a heat source to the points in order to soften the glue enough to remove them. I checked the internet for options.

I found many suggestions on the web, torch, lighters, and others, but the two methods that caught my eye were offered by Dennis Lieu, archery coach at UC Berkeley, in this article. He suggests using hot water and or a hair dryer as the heat source. This appealed to me as these heat sources seemed more benign than a fire source and I didn’t want to over do it on my first time and risk ruining perfectly good arrows.

I don’t have a hair dryer so the water method came first while I put the word out to borrow a hair dryer. Dennis Lieu’s water method is to place a cup of water in the microwave, bring it to a boil, then dip the arrows in and pull the points, re-heating the water as necessary as it cooled down.

Water boils at 212 degrees and I wondered if I could do it with less temperature. I boiled water in a kettle, and in a sturdy glass put in 1/4 of room temperature water to 3/4 boiling water, then placed my wife’s candy thermometer to see what I had.

thermometer

About 154, 155 degrees

The thermometer was reading in the mid 150’s, I placed two arrows in the water, gave them what I felt was enough time (20 – 30 seconds) and tried pulling the points with a pair of linesman pliers.

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Linesman pliers w

I used an old pair of linesman pliers with adhesive cloth tape wrapped around jaws, so as to not mar arrow points.

The points pulled out fine, I flexed the arrows afterwards and visually inspected them, all seemed well.

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Meanwhile, a hair dryer had come through via a friend in town. The hair dryer was 1875 watts, which translates to plenty of heat. After getting the water temperature I was curious what temperature the hair dryer generated. I used the same thermometer and had it consistently top out at 165 to 170 degrees.

I set up out on deck for good light, and heated both the point and the first few inches of the arrow. I rotated the arrow while doing it and kept the dryer in motion to keep the heat even. I had the dryer about an inch from the shaft moving it quickly around the shaft.

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I had no issues pulling the points, as with the water method I flexed and inspected the shafts afterwards and could not detect any problems. Since then I’ve also shot these arrows and I can’t find any damage to the arrows using these methods.

The hot melt glue used in these shafts is Flitemate hot melt glue which is a low temp glue designed for carbon arrows, you may (or may not) need higher temps if you are using a regular temperature hot melt glue.

Dennis Lieu’s methods worked really well for me, it allowed me a lot of control and a mild approach to removing glued in points. In the same article he also describes his method for gluing points in with hot melt, worth a read. Find it here.

 

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Hunting – Year 2

The novice goes into the woods, year two.

The novice being me of course, year one had a lofty learning curve and the steep curve continues this second year.

In the beginning it often seems that the more you know the less you know. The important thing is to grasp enough of the blocky fundamentals to be effective… or lucky!

I had a lucky turkey last year, I wasn’t hunting and a turkey came to me, I still had to do my part but luck it was.

I also shot a doe, not lucky. That really was hunting, the result of scouting, a setup, and persistence.

Deer track

Prior to getting into hunting I envisioned hunting as stalking, while stalking is a method of hunting, I think that the majority of bowhunters in the northeast and possibly elsewhere rely on some sort of ambush, and a successful ambush takes knowledge of your quarry, scouting, setup and patience.

The patience part means waiting, and waiting is directly proportional to how good your information is. If you know deer pass a break in a fence every day at 5:30, then you can setup for that spot and that time, increasing your chances (think game cameras). If you don’t know that you may have to wait all day for a deer to appear and they may not, they may not show up all week and or all month. Having good info is key.

Scouting your quarry, turkeys scat and found feather.

Scouting your quarry, turkeys scat and found feather.

I hunt with a compound bow, although the rest of the year I shoot a recurve. Why  the compound?

Bowtech SWAT on my elevated practice platform, not the latest and greatest, but plenty of bow for the job.

Bowtech SWAT on my elevated practice platform, not the latest and greatest, but plenty of bow for the job.

I just feel that the size, added control of a bow with let off, speed and my comfort level makes the compound a good choice. I’m also a new hunter with plenty to learn, the greater challenge of using a recurve can wait till I’m a better hunter.

Which brings up practice. I shoot a recurve the rest of the year which means that when hunting season approaches, it is important that I get back on my compound horse and practice up. I don’t have any animal targets but I do have plenty of bag targets.

My 20 and 40 yard targets.

My 20 and 40 yard targets.

This year I started my practice at 20 yards to get all the mechanics back then quickly moved out to 40 yards. My thinking being that if I can hone 40 then 20 and 30 should come easier. Once I’m feeling confident I climb up on my roof and practice at 20, 30 and 40 to simulate shooting from a treestand.

Bag targets at 20, 40 and 30 yards, left to right.

Practicing from my roof to simulate treestand conditions, bag targets are set, left to right at 20, 40 and 30 yards.

Practice paying off, 40 yards from elevated position.

Practice paying off, 40 yards from elevated position.

I also tried running to the target and back to get my heart rate up and then shooting to simulate the increased heart rate and adrenalin boost you get when the game you’re hunting shows up.

That is indeed a special moment, when you practice even in challenging situations you are more aware of your form, your bowarm is firm, bowshoulder down, your grip is relaxed and you’re releasing with backtension. When “your” deer shows up, it may fill you with enough buck fever that you pay little to no attention to the shot sequence, form or anything else. The idea is to hone it through enough practice that muscle memory takes over and you make a good shot.

If I have the good fortune this year to draw on a deer I plan to try and focus on form and shot sequence as a way to stay calm. Of course, these things are easy to say, the action of the moment is a completely different thing, so it will remain to be seen.

This is where I’m at on my 2nd year. I’m learning new things, I don’t know what is useful yet, but, we’ll see what proves out over time.

Good luck to all who choose to hunt with a bow. May all your efforts pay off.

Fall Turkey

I came home yesterday in the late afternoon after having had a bit of a trying day, grabbed my compound bow and rangefinder and made my way out to the backyard target.

I had taken the rangefinder because I wanted to practice at 30 and 40 yards and I had not marked the distance. I warmed up at 20 yards then stepped back to 30 yards. I shot a few ends at 30 yards then heard heavy flapping on the other side of my house next to my driveway, I managed to look quickly enough to catch a turkey flying up to it’s roost. I walked further around the corner and switched from a target field tip arrow to a broadheaded  arrow, fortunately my quiver was attached to the bow.

I then spotted a 2nd turkey walking towards the same patch of woods where the first had roosted. I had my rangefinder so I quickly ranged a tree just ahead of him, 30 yards, the single pin sight was already set at that distance, so I drew, waited for the turkey to clear a clump of brush and loosed the arrow.

I hit my mark cleanly in the vitals and with it had my first ever successful hunt. Laurel and the kids arrived shortly thereafter and there was much excitement and the kids and I went down to the country store to tag him. I’d never tagged anything before so it was all novel. I later cleaned it, which was new too, YouTube showing me the way.

It is so interesting the changes we undergo as people, I would not have thought in prior years that I’d be a hunter, fascinating the paths we’ll take and the growth we can experience when we permit it.

C.

The hunting puzzle

It has been heart lifting to be outdoors lately as the temps have been warm and the fall foliage is in the full throes of its seasonal metamorphosis. I often forget how a little time in nature can re-charge one’s batteries and reset your outlook if you’re finding yourself a bit skewed by life.

The fall foliage is of course the most obvious change this time of year but there are others, for example the great amount of mushrooms to be found in the woods this time of year. they are interesting to see and find, like gnomes hiding in the woods.

The oak trees are turning and dropping acorns, which in turn feed the forest to include deer, squirrels and other critters.

The area I live in is oak full. Which in my view is a plus and a minus. A nice boon because it is a food source for deer which means that they’re around, but with so many oaks it is difficult to pinpoint where they’re feeding and where to locate them.

Oak

Acorns – all over the woods behind my house right now.

On the hunting front I’m starting to figure out why the call it hunting and not “getting”. Fortunately for this greenhorn there is a lot more season ahead to make up for the steep learning curve.

I did have an interesting experience while in my treestand in the pitch with just some moonlight out, as I sat,  I spied  green eyes digging at something in the ground a mere 12 yards away. The green eyes had a very faint glow to them, surely reflecting the bit of moonlight out. I thought back to the trail cam pics and how two does frequented this area at about this time, I could barely see the movement of bodies down there, too dark to tell, also not legal shooting time even if I could see. I stood stock still waiting for daylight only to find that they had slipped away in the darkness.

When I climbed down from the stand, I went over to the spot where they’d been and found a mostly nibbled mushroom. Interesting info in my education of whitetails.

Mostly eaten mushroom

I’ve also been finding some signs of a buck in my area. There is an area of saplings that has rubs on it from previous years but I also found some new rubs, see pic.

Rub!

What I’ve found about hunting so far is that it is very puzzle like.There are hints all over the woods left for you to decipher in order to put together a picture of what is going on. How successfully you form that picture and the decisions you make in reaction to your information plays a big part in how you fare out there.

I would also say that this puzzle solving process is an enjoyable one and it constitutes a big part of this endeavor. I’m new to this but I would venture to say that preparing, practice,  research, scouting, interpreting information, then setting up situations based on the knowledge gained is most of the experience. I would put the rest of it as waiting or being patient, good hunters are a patient bunch. The actual encounter with an animal is the smallest part of this, probably falls in the minutes and seconds category for most.

I believe this equation probably changes with experience and technology. A trail camera for example can be your eyes while you’re running your life. Someone who has hunted the same patch of woods for 30  years probably has a lot of accumulated knowledge of the habits of their local quarry and can shorten the process if they so choose.

You can also hire knowledge in the form of a guide or an outfitter if your time and access are short. With our busy lives I’m sure this makes sense for many.

Lastly there is luck, always plays a part. I just need it to play it’s part for me before the season is out!

Treestands – my first

Sunday, I purchased a tree stand, I got the type you hang not the ladder type, I half wished I’d gotten the ladder type as setting it up would have been easier and in the end  cheaper as you don’t have to buy screw in rungs or climbing sticks to get up there, but I wanted to make it as low key as possible so went with a hanging type.

Ladder tree stand

It took me far longer to install than I thought it would, first to assemble the stand then to scout for the right tree on my property, lastly to set it up. I had bought screw in rungs, which screw into the tree, setting these up to 18 ft or so takes a bit, I had an actual aluminum ladder out there with me to help with the process.

Hanging the actual chair was a little less dramatic than I expected but all of it is working at enough height that if you took a fall you could hurt yourself badly. With the chair came a harness and as soon as I could set up a safety line up there, I donned it and climbed up and just sat for a while.

You may know by now that hunting and hunting stuff is new to me so I wasn’t ready after laboring for the respit the stand provided, and how quiet and beautiful it can be up there. I’m guessing half the guys (and gals) are there for the introspection and the hunting is just incidental.

The climb down was a little awkward as I had to do the rung thing and slide the safety prussic knot down as I descended, made me wonder what going up there in the dark was going to be like. There will certainly be a lot of new and firsts in the coming weeks. I’m excited to experience it.

More to come..

My first time in the field

I’m just back from the State of Maine National Field Archery Association championship held at Lakeside Archery in Yarmouth and also my first archery competition ever and I won my class!

The reality check though is that I was the only traditional shooter and the only person in my class, so it was a gimme, I’m still thrilled and happy about it though, and I felt like I shot well for a beginner field archer. (258 in the traditional class)

The highlight of the day though was that I got to shoot with Laird, who’s been involved with archery since the 60’s. He was a good companion and archer, shared some good insights and made it a very pleasant way to spend most of a day. Here are some pics:

This is Laird at 60 plus yards, I can see that the signmarker just ahead of him marks 64 yards

Here is a competitor, shooting the bunny hop which consists of targets at 35, 30, 25, 20 feet, a little trickier than one would think.

Me  at 50 yards.

The shoot was split into two parts 14 field targets and 14 hunter targets for a total round of 28 targets. The hunter targets differ from the field targets in that they are all black with a white center, like the ones below. The hunter round is also different in that you shoot uneven distances and there is a greater variety of distances.

Laird’s neat compound shooting on the right and my not as neat shooting on the left.

After the shoot everyone tallied their scores and Steve from Lakeside gave out awards.

This is what the award looks like:

NFAA medal, sticker and patch

I had a great day walking and shooting in good company, had a terrific introduction to field archery and I had a win, even if it was just me. I am also thankful to the organizers Pam Gallant, Brenda Cousins and Steve Dunsmoor from Lakeside Archery for putting it all together.

Can’t wait to do it again!

Moose or not a moose?

I work in a boatyard and this time of year in Maine is when all the stops come off in order to launch boats, nearly 300 at the yard I work at. Because of our short boating season launching time is always a bottleneck as customers clamor for their boats. It also leaves little time for much else.

Archery had been great as a diversion and a way to unwind, for a short bit after work, usually before/after dinner. I live on the edge of a large wooded area and what I’ve found most relaxing is to go into the woods and go roving. Roving is to walk trough the woods shooting decaying stumps at different distances. It is great practice, fun and you get to walk through nature. It’s also really fun to challenge yourself out there, my usual thing is to wonder if I can shoot through a small gap between trees or miss a branch that’s  in my way or hit a distant stump, etc.

I am also constantly amazed at how a short time amidst the trees can recharge my batteries. Nature is indeed a powerful healer.

A couple of weeks ago I was out there near dusk trampling about when I heard a loud bellowing. My ears pricked up and I stopped right in my tracks.. heard nothing so kept walking then heard that loud bellowing again. I knew it wasn’t a deer, for a split second I wondered if it was a bard owl who had lost his “who cooks for you” cadence but the more I heard him, the more I wondered if I wasn’t hearing a moose. Now moose are seen less in more populated southern Maine vs northern and Downeast Maine but they must get a bug about heading south now and then because one will appear somewhere down here and make the news and be the buzz around town. I heard him a few more times and then went inside to get something to record his bellow, where I found Laurel and kids watching an episode of Survivorman, which was a little surreal since I was just outside with a moose, I hurried back out but when I got to the woods, he was, of course, gone.

Next day at work I spoke with a couple of people starting with John who just moved from Downeast Maine. I did my best bellowing imitation and he indeed thought it was a moose, he in turn thought I should listen to his crow call. He cupped his hands around his mouth, arced his body and let loose a great caw, best I ever heard.  I must say I was very impressed and confirmed in my belief that Maine boatyards house all sorts of interesting folks.

After hearing the caw and talking moose I was pretty excited so when I ran into Mike who grew up in Aroostook county, drinks Moxie and adds maple syrup to his mojitos, I knew I’d found my second confirmation source. I did my bellow and Mike indeed thought it must have been a moose.

I don’t know why it is that hearing a sound in the woods could become such an event in my life but I am sure glad of having experienced it and the interesting people around me.

In my last post I did a short video on stumpin’ below is the 2nd in that series, with more editing and a little suprise funny mishap at the end…